The mileage rates for 2016 are now available and are noted here.

The IRS recently announced mileage rates to be used for travel in 2016. The Business mileage rate decreases by 3.5 cents while Medical and Moving mileage rates are lowered by 4.0 cents. Charitable mileage rates are unchanged.

2016 New Mileage Rates

Standard Mileage Rates
Mileage Rate/Mile
Business Travel 54.0¢
Medical/Moving 19.0¢
Charitable Work 14.0¢
Mileage Rates

Here are 2015 rates for your reference as well.

2015 Mileage Rates

Standard Mileage Rates
Mileage Rate/Mile
Business Travel 57.5¢
Medical/Moving 23.0¢
Charitable Work 14.0¢
Mileage Rates

Remember to properly document your mileage to receive full credit for your miles driven.

2014 Mileage Rates

2014 Mileage Rates

After a long delay, the IRS finally announces the standard mileage rates for travel during 2014.

The IRS recently announced mileage rates to be used for travel in 2014. The Business, Medical, and Moving mileage rates decrease one half cent versus 2013 while charitable rates remain unchanged. Business mileage decreases 1/2 cent per mile.

2014 New Mileage Rates

Standard Mileage Rates
Mileage
2014 Rate/Mile
Business Travel
56.0¢
Medical/Moving
23.5¢
Charitable Work
14.0¢

Mileage Rates

Here are 2013 rates for your reference as well.

2013 Mileage Rates

Standard Mileage Rates
Mileage
Rate/Mile
Business Travel
56.5¢
Medical/Moving
24.0¢
Charitable Work
14.0¢

Mileage Rates

With 2014 right around the corner, please plan accordingly.

Does Your Mileage Log Travel the Distance?

What you need to know to ensure your allowable business, charitable and medical miles are not dismissed during an audit.

The tax code allows deductions for qualified miles driven for business, medical, moving and charitable purposes. But to claim this deduction you must keep adequate records of actual miles driven. During an audit this is an often disallowed deduction, despite the fact that you actually drove the distance claimed. How to make sure this doesn’t happen to you? Here are some tips.

  1. Keep a log. The tax code is clear on this point. You may not estimate your miles driven. You must support your claimed deduction, ideally with a detailed mileage log.
  2. Create good habits. Your odometer reading and miles driven should be noted as soon as possible after the event. Keep a log book in your car and note the miles each day. Logs created after the fact with estimated miles driven could be disallowed during an audit.
  3. Make thorough entries. Note the odometer readings, date, miles driven, the to/from locations, and the qualified purpose for the trip.
  4. Don’t lose out on the extras. The deduction for miles driven is meant to provide a deduction for fuel, depreciation, and repairs. You can also deduct out-of-pocket expenses for tolls, parking and other transportation fees. Keep a running total of these fees in the back of your mileage log.
  5. Keep separate logs for each deduction. Remember you may deduct mileage for business, charitable purposes, qualified moving and medical miles. It is best to keep track of each in a separate mileage log.
  6. Alternative business transportation deduction. When it comes to deducting business transportation expense, remember the miles driven method is not the only one available to you. You may also deduct your actual expenses, but how and when you make this determination is important. In the initial year of placing your auto into service for your business, it is best to keep track and record all your actual auto expenses. An analysis can then be conducted to see which method is best for you to maximize your deduction.